Following are just some examples of selected research studies involving the Alexander Technique.  All examples are peer-reviewed.

Randomised Controlled Trial of Alexander Technique Lessons, Exercise, and Massage (ATEAM) for Chronic and Recurrent Back Pain. Little P et al (2008). British Medical Journal 337:a884.  

In this study, 579 subjects with chronic and recurrent back pain were randomized to receive massage, six Alexander Technique lessons, 24 Alexander Technique lessons, or no intervention. In addition, half of the subjects were encouraged to walk regularly. A year later, the group with no intervention had 21 days of pain per month. The group with massage had 14 days of pain per month. The group with six Alexander Technique lessons reported 11 days of pain per month, and the group with 24 Alexander Technique lessons reported three days of pain per month. There were no adverse effects.

Patients’ views of receiving lessons in the Alexander Technique and an exercise prescription for managing back pain in the ATEAM trialYardley L et al (2010). Family Practice 27 (2):198-204.  

Subjects from the ATEAM study (above) were interviewed about their experience with the Alexander Technique lessons and exercise. Whereas many obstacles to exercising were reported, few barriers to learning the Alexander Technique were described, since it ‘made sense’, could be practiced while carrying out everyday activities or relaxing, and the teachers provided personal advice and support. 

Taking Charge, Choosing a New Direction: A Service Evaluation of Alexander Technique Lessons for Pain Clinic Patients (SEAT): an Approach to Pain Management   McClean, S. and Wye, L. (June 2012) Project Report. UWE Bristol, Bristol.

A high quality clinical trial carried out in an experimental setting has demonstrated the therapeutic value and effectiveness of Alexander Technique (AT) lessons for chronic back pain.  The findings suggest that lessons in the AT are feasible, acceptable and beneficial in terms of improving quality of life and patients' management of pain.  Greatest changes were found in how the patients/students managed their pain (more than half stopped or reduced their medication) and the impact that the pain had on their daily lives. This also led to some behavioural changes and changes in awareness and self-knowledge on the part of the patients/students. These attitudinal and behavioural changes may explain the finding that students of the AT appeared to reduce their pain related NHS costs by half.

Early Experiences of a Multidisciplinary Pain Management ProgrammeFisher K (1988). Holistic Medicine, 3(1):47-56

Chronic pain sufferers participated in a multiple-intervention study. During the study, after three months, and one year later, the subjects rated the Alexander Technique as the most helpful method for relieving chronic pain.

Nobel Lecture entitled Ethology and Stress Diseases. Tinbergen N (1973).

Nikolaas Tinbergen, Nobel Laureate, wrote about F. M. Alexander and the importance of Alexander's discoveries.  He strongly recommended it as a sophisticated form of rehabilitation for all stress-related diseases, i.e., rheumatism, high blood pressure, breathing problems and sleep disorders.


For more information on additional research on the Alexander Technique please visit – (refer to AmSAT website address link for RESEARCH).